Ciencia habilitada por datos de especímenes

Roberts, J., & Florentine, S. (2021). Biology, distribution and control of the invasive species Ulex europaeus (Gorse): A global synthesis of current and future management challenges and research gaps. Weed Research. doi:10.1111/wre.12491 https://doi.org/10.1111/wre.12491

Ulex europaeus (Gorse) is one of the most invasive shrubs in the world, being now found in more than 50 countries where it economically and environmentally degrades the land. This highly versatile shrub can live more than 30 years and produce over 18,000 fertile seeds annually that can remain viable…

Erickson, K. D., & Smith, A. B. (2021). Accounting for imperfect detection in data from museums and herbaria when modeling species distributions: combining and contrasting data‐level versus model‐level bias correction. Ecography. doi:10.1111/ecog.05679 https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.05679

The digitization of museum collections as well as an explosion in citizen science initiatives has resulted in a wealth of data that can be useful for understanding the global distribution of biodiversity, provided that the well-documented biases inherent in unstructured opportunistic data are accoun…

Dellinger, A. S., Pérez‐Barrales, R., Michelangeli, F. A., Penneys, D. S., Fernández‐Fernández, D. M., & Schönenberger, J. (2021). Low bee visitation rates explain pollinator shifts to vertebrates in tropical mountains. New Phytologist. doi:10.1111/nph.17390 https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.17390

Evolutionary shifts from bee to vertebrate pollination are common in tropical mountains. Reduction in bee pollination efficiency under adverse montane weather conditions was proposed to drive these shifts. Although pollinator shifts are central for the evolution and diversification of angiosperms, w…

Zamora‐Gutiérrez, V., Rivera‐Villanueva, A. N., Martínez Balvanera, S., Castro‐Castro, A., & Aguirre‐Gutiérrez, J. (2021). Vulnerability of bat‐plant pollination interactions due to environmental change. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.15611 https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15611

Plant‐pollinator interactions are highly relevant to society as many crops important for humans are animal pollinated. However, changes in climate and land use may put such interacting patterns at risk by disrupting the occurrences between pollinators and the plants they pollinate. Here, we analyse …

Saldaña‐López, A., Vilà, M., Lloret, F., Manuel Herrera, J., & González‐Moreno, P. (2021). Assembly of species’ climatic niches of coastal communities does not shift after invasion. Journal of Vegetation Science, 32(2). doi:10.1111/jvs.12989 https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12989

Question: Do invasions by invasive plant species with contrasting trait profiles (Arctotheca calendula, Carpobrotus spp., Conyza bonariensis, and Opuntia dillenii) change the climatic niche of coastal plant communities? Location: Atlantic coastal habitats in Huelva (Spain). Methods: We identifi…

Akin-Fajiye, M., & Akomolafe, G. F. (2021). Disturbance is an important predictor of the distribution of Lantana camara and Chromolaena odorata in Africa. Vegetos. doi:10.1007/s42535-020-00179-6 https://doi.org/10.1007/s42535-020-00179-6

Most studies of invasion have used climatic variables without considering the importance of disturbance on the distribution of the species. In this study, MAXENT was used to model how disturbance, in addition to climatic factors, can affect the invasion of two of the most problematic plant invaders …

Brendel, M. R., Schurr, F. M., & Sheppard, C. S. (2020). Inter‐ and intraspecific selection in alien plants: How population growth, functional traits and climate responses change with residence time. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.13228 https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13228

Aim: When alien species are introduced to new ranges, climate or trait mismatches may initially constrain their population growth. However, inter‐ and intraspecific selection in the new environment should cause population growth rates to increase with residence time. Using a species‐for‐time approac…

Deanna, R., Wilf, P., & Gandolfo, M. A. (2020). New physaloid fruit‐fossil species from early Eocene South America. American Journal of Botany, 107(12), 1749–1762. doi:10.1002/ajb2.1565 https://doi.org/10.1002/ajb2.1565

Premise: Solanaceae is a scientifically and economically important angiosperm family with a minimal fossil record and an intriguing early evolutionary history. Here, we report a newly discovered fossil lantern fruit with a suite of features characteristic of Physalideae within Solanaceae. The fossil…

Orr, M. C., Hughes, A. C., Chesters, D., Pickering, J., Zhu, C.-D., & Ascher, J. S. (2020). Global Patterns and Drivers of Bee Distribution. Current Biology. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2020.10.053 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2020.10.053

Insects are the focus of many recent studies suggesting population declines, but even invaluable pollination service providers such as bees lack a modern distributional synthesis. Here, we combine a uniquely comprehensive checklist of bee species distributions and >5,800,000 public bee occurrence re…

Iqbal, I., Shabbir, A., Shabbir, K., Barkworth, M., Bareen, F., & Khan, S. (2020). Evolvulus nummularius (L.) L. (Convolvulaceae): a new alien plant record for Pakistan. BioInvasions Records, 9(4), 702–711. doi:10.3391/bir.2020.9.4.04 https://doi.org/10.3391/bir.2020.9.4.04

Evolvulus nummularius (L.) L., a member of the Convolvulaceae, is native to Mexico and South America but nowadays grows around the world in many tropical and subtropical regions. Its presence in Pakistan, where it has become naturalized, is reported here for the first time. It was first discovered i…